The Sound of Music

Bankstown Theatre Company

July 27- August 5, 2018
Bryan Brown Theatre, Cnr Rickard Rd & Chapel St
Director: Glenda Kenyon; Musical Director: Ian Buchanan

Julie Andrews’ and Christopher Plummer’s most beloved musical, The Sound of Music has arrived at the Bryan Brown Theatre. Wait, shouldn’t that be Rogers’ and Hammerstein’s Sound of Music? So you would think, however, so ingrained are the portrayals of Maria and Captain Von Trapp by Andrews and Plummer that any production since that movie has to deal with many expectations: how the cast should look, act and sound. But how do you meet expectations when casting requires strong, lyrical voices and chemistry between the players?

BW_low res

Maria (Lauren Eade), the Captain (Peter Sahlani) and the Von Trapp family children

Director, Glenda Kenyon, has been gifted with the considerable vocal talents of Lauren Eade as Maria. With eyes open you may see Eade but close them and you’ll hear Julie Andrews. Eade’s stage presence charms throughout the 3 hour production. When the children, pining for their missing governess finally hear her make her return, their joy is easily transferred to the audience. In a production that translates the iconic scenes from the movie onto the stage the children’s delightful choreography will cuckoo childhood memories from the cobwebs. The children shine.

bw2_low res

Lauren Eade as Maria and Dale Selsby as the Mother Abbess

The sound of voices are the strength of this production. Peter Sahlani plays his emotions on his sleeve while his voice is a nice complement to Eade’s. Dale Selsby encapsulates the Mother Abbess – her still authority and her compassion. Her characterization is flawless. The deep resonance of Daniel Rae’s (Rolf) singing is powerful as it’s unexpected. I wanted to hear from him.

Liesl_Rolf low res

Courtney Emmas as the 16 year old Leisl and Daniel Rae as her beau, Rolf.

There are a few surprises for those who haven’t seen the stage show before. Did you know that the Baroness and Uncle Max sing? Taking license from this difference between stage and screen, Simon Fry’s Uncle Max is a distinct departure from the austere impresario you may expect. Melissa Goman’s calculating Elsa sheds some of the icy chic for a song and dance with Max. Generally, the production pays homage to the movie from the characterisation of the nuns to the look of final scene in the abbey garden.
It’s an ambitious production. The Bryan Brown theatre, for those who haven’t patronized it before, is a comfortable, air-conditioned modern, facility with ample underground parking in the heart of Bankstown. The stage sports a wide apron of seating that keeps the audience close and performances are afforded a certain amount of leeway for intimacy despite its capacity. However, the stage itself is not deep. The staging and cast size of this production exceeds the limitations of that depth. The operatic scope of the set would have better been realized on a bigger stage.
Fans of the movie will find much to enjoy in this family classic. I challenge anyone to see it and not have joyful echoes of,  “Doe a deer …” ringing around their thoughts for days afterwards.

Matinees and evenings showing at the Bryan Brown Theatre, Cnr Rickard Rd and Chapel St, Bankstown until Sunday August 5th.

Tickets are available online or by phone: 0481 869 858

Photo Credits

HeyMish PR

A version of this review, catered for the St George and Sutherland Shire communities was first published in the online Leader.

 

Advertisements